Tag Archives: thirty

“The ‘Sign’ Read: ‘If Momma Ain’t Happy, Ain’t Nobody Happy!’” – John 2:1-11†


 070114_weddinggift

 

2nd Sunday of Ordinary Time

 

T. table_of_contentsoday’s Content:

  • ·        Dan’s Deliberations, Discoveries, & Declarations
  • ·        Quote of the Day
  • ·        Today’s Gospel Reading
  • ·        Gospel Reflection
  • ·        Reflection Prayer  

ТТТ

Dan’s Deliberations, Discoveris, & Declarations:

 

Please let me explain why I did not publish a blog Wednesday.  I have a chronic eye condition known in the medical field as “keratoconus”.  Patients with this condition have misshaped globes of the eye.  Instead of the ckeratoconus-demoorneas being round and smooth, my eyes are shaped like the ends of footballs, and with ridges on their surfaces.  Thus, I wear specially made (very expensive) contacts in order to see well enough for daily living.  Without these contacts, my vision is like looking through a very thin layer of petroleum jelly.  Eventually, I will have to have corneal transport surgery on both eyes, but obviously, I wish to postpone this surgery as long as is reasonable.

One of my eyes has started to develop blood vessels on the cornea; some2816_2835_3thing very bad for future corneal transplant surgery.  Thus, I have to use four different medications on the eye throughout the day and night, and I am unable to wear a contact in this eye until some point after my surgery.  Laser surgery is scheduled for late February (He will burn the blood vessels on my cornea with the laser). 

For now, it is difficult to read due to the resultant blurriness of not wearing the contact.  For this reason, I have to limit my reflection blog to Sundays – – only FOR NOWI am also asking for your prayers in this matter.  Thank you in advance.

ТТТ

            

Quote of the Day:

To turn water into wine, and what is common into what is holy, is indeed the glory of Christianity.” ~ Frederick William Robertson

ТТТ

Today’s reflection: Jesus performs his first sign at a wedding feast in Cana.  Jesus heard and obeyed His mother, Mary – – the mother of God; Do YOU?!

070114_weddinggift

(NAB John 2:1-11)  1On the third day there was a wedding in Cana in Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there.  2 Jesus and his disciples were also invited to the wedding.  3 When the wine ran short, the mother of Jesus said to him, “They have no wine.”  4 [And] Jesus said to her, “Woman, how does your concern affect me?  My hour has not yet come.”  5 His mother said to the servers, “Do whatever he tells you.”  6 Now there were six stone water jars there for Jewish ceremonial washings, each holding twenty to thirty gallons.  7 Jesus told them, “Fill the jars with water.”  So they filled them to the brim.  8 Then he told them, “Draw some out now and take it to the headwaiter.”  So they took it.  9 And when the headwaiter tasted the water that had become wine, without knowing where it came from (although the servers who had drawn the water knew), the headwaiter called the bridegroom 10 and said to him, “Everyone serves good wine first, and then when people have drunk freely, an inferior one; but you have kept the good wine until now.”  11 Jesus did this as the beginning of his signs * in Cana in Galilee and so revealed his glory, and his disciples began to believe in him.

ТТТ

 

Gos. Reflectionpel Reflection:

This Sunday we begin the liturgical season of Ordinary Time.  For many Sundays in this lectionary cycle (Cycle C), our readings will be taken from the Gospel of Luke.  Occasionally, however, we will read from John’s Gospel [as we do in every lectionary cycle].  Today’s Gospel reading comes from John, describing the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry and His first miracle – – His first “sign”.

To situate today’s reading within the context of John’s Gospel, we need to know that this event follows Jesus’ call of His first six disciples (cf., John 1:35-51).  John tells us that Jesus and His disciples were invited to this wedding at Cana, along with Jesus’ mother, Mary.  This event is unique to John’s Gospel.  There are no parallel reports of this miraculous “sign” at Cana in any of the Synoptic Gospels.

Today’s Gospel is about “Signs (“sēmeion” in Greek).  John uses “signs” to re5030826-directional-signs-vector-or-xxl-jpeg-imageveal Jesus as the true promised Messiah to ALL “Israel”.  John uses “signs” to symbolize Jesus’ wondrous actions, His deeds.  We need to remember that the Gospel according to John is quite different in character from Matthew, Mark, and Luke.  His writing style is highly literate and symbolic in nature.  It does not follow the same order, nor reproduce the same stories, as the other three Gospels.  To a much greater degree as that of the three other Gospel writers, it is the product of a theological reflection growing out of a different circle of readers, and their different traditions.  John’s Gospel was probably written in Ephesus during 90’s AD. 

John’s Gospel narrative contains a series of “signs”, seven to be exact (They will be listed near the end of this reflection.).  John’s Gospel’s relates God’s “Word” through a series of wondrous deeds – – actions – – by Jesus Himself.  It gives the impression that John is primarily interested in the “significance” of these actions. 

The first sign in today’s Gospel reading, is the “transformation of water into wine” at a wedding feast in a place called Cana (John 2:1jesus_wine1–11).  This first “sign” represents the replacement of the Jewish ceremonial washings (John 2:6), and symbolizes the entire creative and transforming work of Jesus then, and still today.  He is still actually transforming US ALL through our hearing of His “Word” and the fellowships of our Church’s seven Sacraments.

So, the Old Testament exodus stories provide the background for today’s reading:

“Recall today that it was not your children, who have neither known nor seen the discipline of the LORD, your God—His greatness, His strong hand and outstretched arm; the signs and deeds He wrought in the midst of Egypt, on Pharaoh, king of Egypt, and on all his land; what He did to the Egyptian army and to their horses and chariots, engulfing them in the waters of the Red Sea as they pursued you, so that the LORD destroyed them even to this day … Moses summoned all Israel and said to them, You have seen with your own eyes all that the LORD did in the land of Egypt to Pharaoh and all His servants and to all His land(Deuteronomy 11:2-4; 29:1-2).

God’s intervention in human history is anew again – – in a new, fulfilled, and fulfilling way – –  through Jesus Christ in the midst of His brethren today.

T

The first verse talks about Jesus being in a place called “Cana”:

On the third day there was a wedding in Cana in Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there” (NAB John 2:1-11). 

Cana is NEVER mentioned in the Old Testament.  The only other (two) biblical references to “Cana” can be found(1) in John 4:46, which mentions Jesus, while in “Cana”, being asked to heal the son of a royal official at Capernaum; and (2) in John 21:2, where the Apostle Nathanael (Bartholomew in the Synoptic Gospels’) comes from “Cana”.  Cana of Galilee is not mentioned in any other book of the Bible, or in any other contemporary literary source.  So where is “Cana”, and why is this place significant to John?  I do not know with certainly.  Speculation is rampant among bible scholars, but I would love to find this place someday when finally discovered with certainty.  I hear the wine there is truly divine!

Also in the first verse, “The mother of Jesus” is never mentioned by name.  Matter of fact, Mary is never mentioned by name in John’s Gospel.  And, on tsecret-rosary13aop of this, Joseph is not present at the wedding feast as well.  I suspect Jesus’ earthly “father” had died sometime between his finding his lost Son in the Temple and this event some eighteen years later.

Jesus, per John, addressed His mother by saying “Woman”:

Woman, how does your concern affect me?  My hour has not yet come” (John 2:4).

This was NOT a ‘diss (slang word for “treat with contempt”) on Mary!!  Today, a child would possibly be given the “eveyesil eye” for calling his/her mother “woman” in this way.  However, in actuality, this was a normal and POLITE form of addressing one’s mother during Jesus’ time.  He also calls her by this SAME title while dying on the Holy Cross, at His most intimate – – and final – – time with her:

When Jesus saw His mother and the disciple there whom He loved, He said to His mother, ‘Woman, behold, your son’” (John 19:26).

The word “woman” was a revealed word which was highly exulted (like the word “king”) amoung the Jewish peoples.  Jesus is “the Word made Flesh”.  When Jesus Christ calls His mother “woman”, He is revealing the promised fulfillment in Genesis:

 “I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; They will strike at your head, while you strike at their heel” (Genesis 3:15).

T

Wine was running low, a good “sign” of the celebration being in full force, but a bad sign because – – they are RUNNING OUT OF WINE!  So, Mary, probably helping at the celebration, goes to her son and says:

When the wine ran short, the mother of Jesus said to him, “They have no wine” (John 2:3).

Jesus replies to “His mother”:

Woman, how does your concern affect meMy hour has not yet come” (John 2:4).

If itwasn’t His time”, why did Jesus do what His mother asked?  After all, Jesus never worked miracles solely to help His family and friends.  I believe He performed this first miraculous “sign” out of OBEDIENCE to His mother, ObedienceToTheWordknowing the importance of [what we today know as] the Fourth Commandment and its great importance in God’s kingdom:

Honor your father and your mother, that you may have a long life in the land the LORD your God is giving you … Take to heart these words which I command you today…  Bind them on your arm as a ‘sign’ and let them be as a pendant on your forehead” (Exodus 20:12; Deuteronomy 6:6, 8)  

I wish people today saw and appreciated the need and JOY to be obedient to God’s Commandments, and not to subjugate them – – to de-prioritize them – – out of personally selfish wants and desires. 

Now, let’s go on to discuss the second (of three) points about His reply to His “mother”: 

How does your concern affect me?” (John 2:4)

Everything Jesus says is a fulfillment of Holy Scripture.  He is telling His mother that if He does what she implies, the “cats are ‘gjesusturnedwaterintowineonna be out of the bag”!  Mary is hastening God’s will, My source and My authority by doing a miracle to meet the wedding parties need.  That’s why, I believe, the third revealing point in this one verse relates to Jesus saying: 

My hour has not yet come” (John 2:4).

The “hour”, I believe Jesus is referring to, is His Passion, death, resurrection, and ascension to heaven:hourglass

Before the feast of Passover, Jesus knew that His hour had come to pass from this world to the Father. He loved His own in the world and He loved them to the end” (John 13:1).

I wonder how much Jesus knew about His future at the time of the wedding feast miracle.  Did He know every single detail about His gruesome torture and death to come?  Did He know the beauty He will find in His ascension?  I believe He did.  Do you?  However, Jesus was focusing on His mother’s concern for the wedding couple.  He moved up the clock, revealing His divine authority.  So, He begins a series of seven signs here at “Cana”.

Only after John has Jesus fulfilling these seven “signs”, does the “hour” of Jesus fully arrive.  The whole Gospel of John is a progressivglory-to-god-by-brandon-halliburton-free-photo-11978e “revelation” – – a REVEALING – – of the glory of God’s only begotten Son.  At “Cana”, Jesus is beginning to reveal God the Father fully; which will ne fulfilled later when He returns – – in “glory” – – to His heavenly Father on our behalf.  Jesus did this as the beginning of His signs in Cana in Galilee and so revealed His glory, and His disciples began to believe in Him” (John 2:11).

Jesus’ reply was tjohn2_5SCruly revealing in nature.  However, Mary was not going to take an implied “no” for an answer.  She simply looks at the “servers” and says:

Do whatever He tells you(John 2:5).

Mary knew her Scriptures well; she helped teach them to Jesus.  Mary, in her reply, may have been referencing a verse from the Book of Genesis:

When all the land of Egypt became hungry and the people cried to Pharaoh for food, Pharaoh said to all the Egyptians: ‘Go to Joseph and do whatever he tells you’” (Genesis 41:55).

What I believe was important about Mary’s reason for wanting Jesus to perform a “sign” before His “time”, and His willingness to obif_mama_aint_happy_aint_nobody_happy_magnet-p147594797048165970b2gru_400ey her fully, may have been one of simple logic and survival for Jesus:

If momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy!

Do not forget the Fourth Commandment.  Jesus didn’t!!

T

John goes on to report that:

There were six stone water jars there for Jewish ceremonial washings, each holding twenty to thirty gallons” (John 2:6). 

Twenty to thirty gallons” is a litermarriageincanaal present day translation for the “two or three measures” of Jesus’ day.  This vast quantity of wine recalls prophecies of “abundance in the last days” from Jewish Scripture:

Shouting, they shall mount the heights of Zion, they shall come streaming to the LORD’s blessings: The grain, the wine, and the oil, flocks of sheep and cattle; They themselves shall be like watered gardens, never again neglected” (Jeremiah 31:12);

 “Yes, days are coming—oracle of the LORD—When the one who plows shall overtake the one who reaps and the vintager, the sower of the seed; The mountains shall drip with the juice of grapes, and all the hills shall run with it. will restore my people Israel, they shall rebuild and inhabit their ruined cities, Plant vineyards and drink the wine, set out gardens and eat the fruits.” (Amos 9:13–14).

With this “first sign”, the changing of the water to wine, Jesus is replacing the “Jewish ceremonial washings” with His divine body, blood, soul, and divinity washing away all affects of original sin.  This event also presented the initial revealing – – the initial revelation – – of Jesus’ divine nature and authority at the outset of His public ministry.  

Jesus’ action in this reading points to the “wine of the new covenant” and the “bread of life” He establishes in the “Last Supper” anjesusfirstLOGOd in our present Eucharist.  It also points to the Messianic banquet which Jesus personally will host at the end of time.  (Behold the Lamb of God … Hapy are those invited to the marriage supper of the Lamb!)

The miracles of Jesus’ public ministry – – His “signs” – – demonstrate the power of God’s love and mercy for His people.  God’s kindness knows no limits!  And the ultimate expression of His love is revealed in the person of His Son, our Lord – – Jesus Christ.  He became flesh for OUR sake; He died for OUR redemption; He rose from the dead for OUR glorification!! 

T

John ends his Gospel today by going to the beginning: the beginning of Jesus’ “signs”, the beginning of His revealed “glory”, the beginning of His public ministry, and the beginning of His disciples truly believing in Him as the true promised Messiah:

Jesus did this as the beginning of His signs in Cana in Galilee and so revealed His glory, and His disciples began to believe in Him” (John 2:11).

God reveals His “glory” in the most unlikely places: in a stable at Bethlehem, at a wedding party in Cana, in the muddy waters of the Jordan River, and on a blood stained crosto-god-be-the-glory_137_1024x768s outside the walls of Jerusalem.  Jesus’ first public miracle – – His first “sign” – – was performed at the confident “invitation” of His mother.  In doing as His mother requested of Him, Jesus blessed a young couple, bringing JOY to their wedding feast: first, by His presence, and second, by His surprising response to Hhis mother’s concern, saving them from an embarrassing situation. 

Changing water into wine was a remarkable act of kindness; but saving the best to last was unheard of in Jesus’ day.  In Jewish Scripture (our Old Testament) wine was often seen as a gift anDo-Whatever-He-Tells-You-1024x1024d symbol of God’s blessing (cf., Deuteronomy 7:13; Proverbs 3:10, Psalm 105).  With Jesus miraculously producing 180 gallons or so of the best wine possible, and many times more than what actually was needed for the feast, He showed the superabundance of the blessings He Himself came to offer to All “Israel”, to ALL peoples.

What other signs will Jesus go on to do during His public Ministry?  Well, now would be a good time to list the seven “signs” John reveals through his Gospel:seven-signs

  • The first sign is the transformation of water into wine at Cana (Jn 2:1–11); this represents, as I mentioned earlier, the replacement of the Jewish ceremonial washings and symbolizes the entire creative and transforming work of Jesus.

  • The second sign, the cure of the royal official’s son (Jn 4:46–54) simply by the word of Jesus at a distance, signifies the power of Jesus’ life-giving “Word”.  

  • The third sign, the cure of the paralytic at the pool with five porticoes in John 5, continues the theme of water offering newness of life.  In the preceding chapter, to the woman at the well in Samaria Jesus had offered living water springing up to eternal life, a symbol of the revelation Jesus brings.  Here Jesus’ life-giving “Word” replaces the water of the pool which failed to bring life.

  • John 6 contains two signs: the multiplication of loaves and the walking on the waters of the Sea of Galilee.  These signs are related to the “crossing of the Red Sea” and the manna” of the first exodus, manifesting a new exodus in process.  The multiplication of the loaves anticipates the future revelation of God in Jesus which the bread of life is His visible “sign” which we call the “Eucharist”.  

  • The sixth sign is presented in John 9, the sign of the young man born blind whom Jesus heals. This is a narrative illustration proclaiming the triumph of light over darkness.  Remember, this event takes place in the Temple during the Feast of the Tabernacles (aka, the Feast of Lights) at which there were a multitude of candelabras lighted throughout the “Holy Place”.  Jesus is presenting Himself as the Light of the Temple, and of the world.  The young man had been given his sight by Jesus.  This “sign” was an object lesson, revealing the divine power of Jesus to give light to the eyes, and at the same time, subtly revealing the spiritual blindness of the Pharisees and Levites attending to the Menorah.

  • And finally, the seventh sign, the raising of Lazarus in John 11, is the climax of signs.  Lazarus is presented as a token of the real, spiritually alive, life which Jesus, THE Resurrection and THE Life, who will now ironically be put to death because of His gift of life to Lazarus, desires to give ALL to those believing in Him then, and after He was seen raised from the dead.  Notice the irony of Jesus raising Lazarus and then enduring His own death in place of Lazarus.

John’s purpose in describing these seven signs in their unique order is clearly expressed in what some bible scholars say was the “original” ending of his Gospel, at the end of Chapter 20.  Besides these seven just described:

Jesus did many other signs in the presence of [His] disciples that are not written in this book.  But these are written that you may [come to] believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through this belief you may have life in His name” (John 20:31).

Amen!!  Amen!!          

T

In the Church’s lit. summarize titleurgical history, the “wedding feast at Cana” is closely associated with the “adoration of the child Jesus by the Magi” and the “Baptism of our Lord Jesus Christ”. The “sign” Jesus performs at the wedding feast is an “epiphany” (manifestation) of Jesus’ divinity to be celebrated.flickr-3699162219-hd

With these epiphanies in mind, awareness of Jesus’ Passion and death looming future on the Holy Cross is ever present in John’s Gospel.  Even in today’s narrative of Jesus’ “first sign”, the language used by John anticipates Jesus’ future Passion.  When Jesus says to His “mother” that “His hour has not yet come”, Jesus protests against her wishes in words John used again when describing Jesus’ “Last Supper” with His disciples in John 13:1.  When introducing the story of Jesus washing His disciples’ feet [also only found in John’s Gospel], John writes that Jesus knew His “hour had come”.  Per John, Jesus is very much in command and extremely aware of ALL that is to happen to Him, from the very beginning.

Throughout John’s Gospel, Mary is never mentioned by name, but is referred to instead as “the mother of Jesus”.  Mary is overridingly influential in Jesus’ first “sign”.  She will never abandon her Son, even being present at Jesus’ Crucifixion.  Mary was (and still is) a faithful and constant witness to the final manifestation – – “sign” and epiphany – – of Jesus’ divinity.

John’s Gospel describes seven “signs” indicating Jesus’ true divine nature and identity to His disciples.  He never speaks of these “signwordsandeedslogosas miracles because their importance is not in the deed – – the action – – which Jesus performs, but instead in what these deeds indicate in regard to Jesus’ true nature and identity.  In today’s reading, Jesus’ disciples are said to “begin to believe”.  However, no mention is made as to whether the other wedding guests are even aware of what has happened.  (But, they thought the wine was heavenly in deed!)

Here, at the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry, John’s Gospel seeks to establish that Jesus is going to re-define and fulfill God’s promise to “Israel”.  Jesus is establishing the New Covenant promised to the Water_Wine_Renderprophets.  A hint about what this New Covenant will be like is made evident in His deed – – the action Jesus performs.  Asked to do something about the awkward situation that a lack of wine at the wedding feast would create, Jesus’ miraculous “sign” produces vast quantities of wine: six jars overflowing with over 180 gallons of superior wine.

This overflowing response to a simple human request is a vision for us – – a “sign” – – about the vast abundance of God’s kingdom.  It challenges us to respond generously when confronted with our needs, and others’, today.  Responding as best as we can, fully confident that, like the mother of Jesus, God can transform our efforts, brings the Kingdom of God to fulfillment among us here and now!

T

We. conclusionddings are magnificent and breathtaking celebrations.  We go out of our way to make the occasion festive and extraordinary.  People work hard to please one another with a special kind of JOY.  What better image of the Kingdom of God can there be than070114_weddinggift a wedding feast!  Wedding celebrations are not an everyday occurrence.  ut we can anticipate the Kingdom of God each and every day through our kindness, attention, and care to one another’s needs.

Reflect about weddings and other feasts and HOW they are used as images in Holy Slove others_t_nvcripture for the Kingdom of God.  Consider how these festive occasions are images of God’s tremendous, overflowing, love for us – – and examples of how we can show our love for one another.  Think about Mary’s attentiveness to the needs of the wedding hosts, and about Jesus’ response to His mother’s request.  What can you learn from today’s Gospel story?  Reflect on, and consider ways – – actions or deeds – – in which you might show these same sort of generous and loving values in your daily life.  Create your own “sign” for God’s plan in your life and for His kingdom on earth!!

ТТТ

Reflecti. prayer sfon Prayer: 

Prayer for Generosity

(St. Ignatius of Loyola)

“Eternal Word, only begotten Son of God,
Teach me true generosity. generosity-revolution-revisited-graphic
Teach me to serve you as you deserve.
To give without counting the cost,
To fight heedless of wounds,
To labor without seeking rest,
To sacrifice myself without thought of any reward
Save the knowledge that I have done your will.
Amen.”

ТТТ

 

“Ok, Already; I Forgot the Music for the Passover Meal! So Crucify Me!” – Matthew 26:14-25†


 

Wednesday of Holy Week

Today’s Content:

  • Dan’s Deliberations, Discoveries, & Declarations
  • Today in Catholic History
  • Quote of the Day
  • Today’s Gospel Reading
  • Reflection on Today’s Gospel
  • New Translation of the Mass
  • A Franciscan’s Saint of the Day
  • Franciscan Formation Reflection
  • Reflection on part of  the SFO Rule

Т

Dan’s Deliberations, Discoveries, & Declarations:

I want to thank you Lord for extending to us your graces.  Please be with all of us in all our endeavors, thoughts, and dreams.

Т

Today in Catholic History:

†   1303 – The University of Rome La Sapienza is instituted by Pope Boniface VIII.
†   1314 – Death of Clement V, [Bertrand Got], pope (1305-14) move papacy to Avignon
†   1317 – Death of Agnes van Montepulciano, Italian mystic/saint
†   1534 – Death of Elizabeth Barton, English nun (executed)
†   1586 – Birth of Saint Rose of Lima, Peruvian saint (d. 1617)
†   1884 – Pope Leo XIII published encyclical “On Freemasonry”
†   1884 – Pope Leo XIII publishes the encyclical, Humanum Genus.
†   1999 – Death of victims of the Columbine High School massacre
†   2007 – Death of Michael Fu Tieshan, Chinese bishop (b. 1931)
†   Feasts/Memorials: Saint Agnes of Montepulciano; Saint Theotimus (d. 407); Blessed Oda (d. 1158)

(From the “On This Day” Blog Site
otday.wordpress.com &/OR
“Today in Catholic History”
http://www.historyorb.com)

Т

Quote of the Day:

 

Jesus had no servants, yet they called Him Master
Had no degree, yet they called Him Teacher.
Had no medicines, yet they called Him Healer.
Had no army, yet kings feared Him.
He won no military battles, yet He conquered the world.
He committed no crime, yet they crucified Him.
He was buried in a tomb, yet He lives today.

Т

 

Today’s reflection is about the planning and provision for the “Last Supper” and pronouncement of Judas’ disloyalty, deceit, and betrayal.

 (NAB Matthew 26:14-25) 14 Then one of the Twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests 15 and said, “What are you willing to give me if I hand him over to you?”  They paid him thirty pieces of silver, 16 and from that time on he looked for an opportunity to hand him over.  17 On the first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, the disciples  pproached Jesus and said, “Where do you want us to prepare for you to eat the Passover?”  18 He said, “Go into the city to a certain man and tell him, ‘The teacher says, “My appointed time draws near; in your house I shall celebrate the Passover with my disciples.”‘”  19 The disciples then did as Jesus had ordered, and prepared the Passover.  20 When it was evening, he reclined at table with the Twelve.  21 And while they were eating, he said, “Amen, I say to you, one of you will betray me.”  22 Deeply distressed at this, they began to say to him one after another, “Surely it is not I, Lord?”  23 He said in reply, “He who has dipped his hand into the dish with me is the one who will betray me.  24 The Son of Man indeed goes, as it is written of him, but woe to that man by whom the Son of Man is betrayed. It would be better for that man if he had never been born.”  25 Then Judas, his betrayer, said in reply, “Surely it is not I, Rabbi?”  He answered, “You have said so.” 

Т

Have you ever wondered why Judas betrayed his “Master”, his “Rabbi”, his “dear” friend?  I know I have!  This specific question is towards
the top of my list of questions that I plan on asking some day (yet, hopefully not soon though).

Judas Iscariot” is an Apostle that is not really made as factually well-known to us as some of the other major disciples of Jesus Christ.  I believe he was a “zealot”, and possibly even a member of the same group of Jewish rebels who attempted the military overthrow of Roman rule in Palestine in the 1st and 2nd centuries AD.  The name Iscariot, per NAB footnote) may mean “man from Kerioth”, a city of Judah.

What was his reason for his actions?  Were Judas’ deceitfulness, disloyalty, and treasonous actions toward Jesus Christ provoked by greed?
Was he disappointed with Jesus because of an action or non-action?  Or did he come be disillusioned in Jesus’ message, and way?

It could be that Judas never intended for Jesus Christ to die (though he should have known the consequence of his actions).  Maybe he wanted to “push” Jesus into some type of action – – a stimulus plan of sorts.   Did Judas think Jesus was proceeding too slowly and/or not acting forcefully and violently enough in His setting up of the “messianic” kingdom on earth?  Perhaps Judas simply wanted to force Jesus’
hand by forcing and coercing Him to start an armed, substantially physical, act of some unknown type.

What we can surmise, however, is that Judas somehow could not accept Jesus Christ as He was, and in the plan of His humanly divine mission.  But, aren’t we tempted to use God for our own purposes as well, at times?  We have to remember, it is not God who must change to fit our needs.  We must be changed by Him, so we can fulfill His needs.

The motive of greed is introduced by Judas’s question, “What are you willing to give me if I hand him over to you?” in regards to the price for betrayal.  Curiously, this sentence is absent in Mark’s Gospel:

“Then Judas Iscariot, one of the Twelve, went off to the chief priests to hand him over to them.  When they heard him they were pleased and promised to pay him money.  Then he looked for an opportunity to hand him over.” (Mark 14:10-11).

Hand him over”, however, is in both accounts (Matthew’s and Mark’s).  The same Greek verb is used to express the saving purpose of God the Father by which Jesus Christ is handed over to death, and the human malice that hands him over:

As they were gathering in Galilee, Jesus said to them, “The Son of Man is to be handed over to men.” (Matthew 17:22);

“Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and
they will condemn him to death.”
(Matthew 20:18);

And,

“You know that in two days’ time it will be Passover, and the Son of Man will be handed over to be crucified.” (Matthew 26:2).

Т

The chief priest’s intent was to put Jesus to death.  They plotted for a long time, yet delayed their thirst for His death out of fear of Jesus’ following in society and out of the fear of the crowds around Him nearly continuously.

There are many references to “thirty pieces of silver throughout Holy Scripture.  “Thirty pieces of silver” (about 21 ounces) was the price Judas agreed upon with the Temple leaders in his contract of betrayal; in his being a traitor of Jesus.  The amount of money paid to Judas
is found only in Matthew’s account.  It is derived from the Old Testament Book of Zechariah, where it is the wages paid to the rejected shepherd:

I said to them, ‘If it seems good to you, give me my wages; but if not, let it go.’ And they counted out my wages, thirty pieces of silver.  But the LORD said to me, ‘Throw it in the treasury, the handsome price at which they valued me.’ So I took the thirty pieces of silver and threw them into the treasury in the house of the LORD.” (Zechariah 11:12-13).

The amount: “thirty pieces of silver” was also the compensation paid to one whose slave has been gored by an ox:

But if it is a male or a female slave that it gores, he must pay the owner of the slave thirty shekels of silver, and the ox must be stoned.” (Exodus 21:32).

Interesting for me is that five shekels was the price Mary and Joseph had to pay at the Temple (by Mosaic Law) for Jesus’ redemption, at
the time He was “Presented” to the Temple at eight days of age (cf., Luke 2:22-40).  It is now thirty shekels (about 21 ounces of pure silver) that officials of the same Temple are paying to condemn Jesus Christ to death – – and for OUR redemption.

Т

Unleavened bread took the form of loaves which had to be eaten over a seven day period, in commemoration of the unleavened bread which the Israelites had to take with them in their hurry to leave Egypt:

The people, therefore, took their dough before it was leavened, in their kneading bowls wrapped in their cloaks on their shoulders.” (Exodus 12:34).

In Jesus Christ’s time, the Passover supper was celebrated on the first day of the week of Unleavened Bread.

Most Catholics do not understand this Jewish festival.  Both the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread are two separate events, co-mingled.  The two festivals are reflected in the following Old Testament verses:

You shall keep the feast of Unleavened BreadFor seven days at the prescribed time in the month of Abib you are to eat unleavened bread, as I commanded you; for in the month of Abib you came out of Egypt.” (Exodus 34:18);

“These, then, are the festivals of the LORD which you shall celebrate at their proper time with a sacred assembly.  The Passover of the LORD falls on the fourteenth day of the first month, at the evening twilight.  The fifteenth day of this month is the LORD’S feast of Unleavened Bread.  For seven days you shall eat unleavened bread.  On the first of these days you shall hold a sacred assembly and do no sort of work.  On each of the seven days you shall offer an oblation to the LORD. Then on the seventh day you shall again hold a sacred assembly and do no sort of work.” (Leviticus 23:4-8);

“’Tell the Israelites to celebrate the Passover at the prescribed time.  The evening twilight of the fourteenth day of this month is the prescribed time  when you shall celebrate it, observing all its rules and regulations.’  Moses, therefore, told the Israelites to celebrate the Passover.  And they did so, celebrating the Passover in the desert of Sinai during the evening twilight of the fourteenth day of the first month, just as the LORD had commanded Moses.  There were some, however, who were unclean because of a human corpse and so could not keep the Passover that day.  These men came up to Moses and Aaron that same day and said, ‘Although we are unclean because of a corpse, why should we be deprived of presenting the LORD’S offering at its proper time along with the other Israelites?’  Moses answered them, ‘Wait until I learn what the LORD will command in your regard.’  The LORD then said to Moses: ‘Speak to the Israelites and say: If any one of you or of your descendants is unclean because of a corpse, or if he is absent on a journey, he may still keep the LORD’S Passover.  But he shall keep it in the second month, during the evening twilight of the fourteenth day of that month, eating it with unleavened bread and bitter herbs, and not leaving any of it over till morning, nor breaking any of its bones, but observing all the rules of the Passover.  However, anyone who is clean and not away on a journey, who yet fails to keep the Passover, shall be cut off from his people, because he did not present the LORD’S offering at the prescribed time.  That man shall bear the consequences of his sin.  ‘If an alien
who lives among you wishes to keep the LORD’S Passover, he too shall observe the rules and regulations for the Passover.  You shall have the same law for the resident alien as for the native of the land.
’ (Numbers 9:2-14);

On the fourteenth day of the first month falls the Passover of the LORD, and the fifteenth day of this month is the pilgrimage feast. For seven days unleavened bread is to be eaten.” (Numbers 28:16-17);

And,

Observe the month of Abib by keeping the Passover of the LORD, your God, since it was in the month of Abib that he brought you by night out of Egypt.  You shall offer the Passover sacrifice from your flock or your herd to the LORD, your God, in the place which he chooses as the dwelling place of his name.  You shall not eat leavened bread with it.  or seven days you shall eat with it only unleavened bread, the bread of affliction, that you may remember as long as you live the day of your departure from the land of Egypt; for in frightened haste you left the land of Egypt.  Nothing leavened may be found in all your territory for seven days, and none of the meat which you sacrificed on the evening of the first day shall be kept overnight for the next day.  ‘You may not sacrifice the Passover in any of the communities which the LORD, your God, gives you; only at the place which he chooses as the dwelling place of his name, and in the evening at sunset, on the anniversary of your departure from Egypt, shall you sacrifice the Passover.  You shall cook and eat it at the place the LORD, your God, chooses; then in the morning you may return to your tents.  For six days you shall eat unleavened bread, and on the seventh there shall be a solemn meeting in honor of the LORD, your God; on that day you shall not do any sort of work.’” (Deuteronomy 16:1-8).;

Every male adult Jew was expected to make a pilgrimage to Jerusalem at some time in their life.  If possible, the Jewish people living near Jerusalem were to celebrate Passover every year in Jerusalem.

This annual feast commemorated the deliverance of the people of Israel from their slavery in Egypt (see Exodus 12).  On that night the angel of death slew the first-born of the Egyptians; but he “passed over” the homes of the Israelites, because the wooden beam and jams of their doors were smeared with the blood of an unblemished lamb sacrificed for the occasion.

Jesus Christ was also an “unblemished” (sin-free), “lamb” (human offering) sacrificed at Passover, and His blood was smeared on the wooden beams of the Holy Cross.

The “Feast of the Unleavened Bread” was continued from Nisan 14, through Nisan 21 (7 days of the Hebrew Calendar), a reminder of the suffering and difficulty the Israelites experienced, and of the haste surrounding their departure from Egypt.  Praise and thanks to God for His goodness in the past year were combined at this “dual festival”, along with the hope of future salvation in the coming years.

Т

Matthew and Mark have parallel and similar versions of sending disciples into the Jerusalem for the acquisition of a room for the
Passover meal:

He said, “Go into the city to a certain man and tell him, ‘The teacher says, “My appointed time draws near; in your house I shall celebrate the Passover with my disciples.”‘”(Matthew 26:18)

In comparison to,

“He sent two of his disciples and said to them, ‘Go into the city and a man will meet you, carrying a jar of water.  Follow him.  Wherever he enters, say to the master of the house, “The Teacher says, ‘Where is my guest room where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?’” Then he will show you a large upper room furnished and ready. Make the preparations for us there.’” (Mark 14:13-15)

By Matthew leaving out much of Mark’s version, along with adding “My appointed time draws near”, plus, turning His question (in Marks Gospel) into a statement (in Matthew’s), the passage is presented in a formal, solemn, and majestic way, making his presentation far greater (for me) than is presented in Mark’s version.

The passage from today’s reading (verse 18) refers to an “unknown” person as the one to approach in order to acquire a place for the Passover meal.  In reality, I believe Jesus gave this person’s real name.  After all, Jesus was not unknown in Jerusalem, and had been there many, many times.  He was “connected” in that city.  From what the other Evangelists write, Jesus most certainly gave enough information to enable His Apostles to find a place.

“He sent two of his disciples and said to them, ‘Go into the city and a man will meet you, carrying a jar of water. Follow him.’” (Mark 14:13);

And

“And he answered them, ‘When you go into the city, a man will meet you carrying a jar of water.  Follow him into the house that he enters.’” (Luke 22:10);

What do you think?  Did Jesus’ disciples go without any knowledge what-so-ever, are did they go with some sort of instructions?

Т

Given Matthew’s interest in the fulfillment of the Old Testament prophesies, I wonder why he leaves out Mark’s words of the “betrayer” being present at the very table eating with them; of Jesus’ betrayer being an Apostle, as in Mark’s version:

“And as they reclined at table and were eating, Jesus said, ‘Amen, I say to you, one of you will betray me, one who is eating with me.’” (Mark 14:18),

However, they both do allude to Psalm 41 in their words.  However, Mark’s words are closer in comparison:

Even the friend who had my trust, who shared my table, has scorned me.” (Psalm 41:10).


For me, the shocking fact is that the “betrayer” was one of the twelve Apostles, chosen personally by Jesus Christ.  The truth is that a “betrayer” who shared the same table and same fellowship with Jesus Christ and His followers, who listened to His teachings and was in His loving embrace – – daily, – – would purposely choose to knowingly hand Jesus over to a certain death.

Т

His resurrection at “Easter” will teach the Apostles so much more about who Jesus Christ truly was.  However, this glorious, magnificent, and miraculous event had not occurred as of this time in first century Palestine.  Their faith was growing, strengthening.  It was being fortified and deepened during the course of Jesus’ public ministry, and though their continual contact with Him and His divine graces which He had imparted on them.

“Jesus did this as the beginning of his signs in Cana in Galilee and so revealed his glory, and his disciples began to believe in him.” (John 2:11);

“Simon Peter answered him, ‘Master, to whom shall we go?  You have the words of eternal life. We have come to believe and are convinced that you are the Holy One of God.’” (John 6:68-69);

And,

“Jesus said to him in reply, ‘Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah.  For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father.’” (Matthew 16:17).

Т

I could never even imagine giving up a friend as dear as Jesus Christ.  The evilness, ruthlessness, and horror of Judas’ actions were such that it would be better for him not to exist than to do what he had done.

It would be better for that man if he had never been born.” (Matthew 26:24).

Jesus in saying, “The Son of Man indeed goes, as it is written of him …” is referring to the “truth” that He will offer Himself up freely to pain, suffering, and death.  In so doing He was fulfilling the will of God, as prophesized, centuries before:

Even the friend who had my trust, who shared my table, has scorned me.(Psalm 41:10);

And,

“Though he was harshly treated, he submitted and opened not his mouth; like a lamb led to the slaughter or a sheep before the shearers; he was silent and opened not his mouth.(Isaiah 53:7).

Although our Lord Jesus Christ goes to His death willingly, and of His own free will, this does not reduce the seriousness of Judas’
treachery.

Т

The advance warning of Judas being the traitor was not noticed by the Apostles:

“Jesus answered, ‘It is the one to whom I hand the morsel after I have dipped it.’  So he dipped the morsel and (took it and) handed it to Judas, son of Simon the Iscariot.  After he took the morsel, Satan entered him.  So Jesus said to him, ‘What you are going to do, do quickly.’  (Now) none of those reclining at table realized why he said this to him.  Some thought that since Judas kept the money bag, Jesus had told him, ‘Buy what we need for the feast,’ or to give something to the poor.’” (John 13:26-29).

Distinctive to Matthew is the half-affirmatives, “You have said so” found several times in his Gospel, including verse 25 from today’s reading:

“Then Judas, his betrayer, said in reply, “Surely it is not I, Rabbi?”  He answered, ‘You have said so.’” (Matthew 26:25),

along with two others:

“Jesus said to him in reply, ‘You have said so.  But I tell you: From now on you will see “the Son of Man seated at the right hand of the Power” and “coming on the clouds of heaven.”'” (Matthew 26:64);

and,

“Now Jesus stood before the governor, and he questioned him, ‘Are you the king of the Jews?’  Jesus said, ‘You say so.’” (Matthew 27:11).

These “half-affirmative”, (sort of “Yes’s”), emphasize the pronoun “you”.  Jesus’ answer implies that His statement – – His near “yes” – – would not have been made if the question had not been asked in the first place.

Т

In Summary, It was at Passover time that Jesus came to Jerusalem knowing he would be betrayed and put to death as the “Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29).  Jesus fulfilled the Passover prophesies.  His new covenant – – fulfilled the old.    His death and resurrection happened at the time of Passover solely in order to redeem US from our life of sin, death, Satan, and worldly needs.

His blood on the wood of the Holy tree, like the blood of the first Passover lamb just prior to the Exodus, protects God’s people from the angel of death and the oppressive power of Satan.  “Easter” is the Catholic Christian Passover:

“Clear out the old yeast, so that you may become a fresh batch of dough, inasmuch as you are unleavened.  For our paschal lamb, Christ, has been sacrificed.  Therefore let us celebrate the feast, not with the old yeast, the yeast of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.” (1 Cor. 5:7-8).

Are you celebrating this Holy Week, this Catholic Passover, with sincerity, love, and truth in your heart?

Jesus knew before the earth existed what would transpire at this time.  As Jesus ate the Passover meal with His twelve Apostles, and saying, “one of you will betray me”, He taught them (and us) to examine theirs, (and OURS), consciousness and actions.  He taught US also to examine ourselves in the light of God’s truth and grace.  We need to ask Him to strengthen our faith, hope, and love (the intentions of the first three “Hail Mary” beads on the rosary) DAILY, so we may not fail Him or abandon Him when tempted.  Pray with confidence, love, hope, and trust the words Jesus gave us to pray for deliverance from evil.

Т

The Our Father

“Our Father, Who art in heaven,
Hallowed be Thy Name.
Thy Kingdom come.
Thy Will be done, on earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.  Amen.”

Pax et Bonum
Dan Halley, SFO

Т

New Translation of the Mass

In November of 2011, with the start of the new Liturgical year and Advent, there will be a few noticeable changes in the Mass.  It will still be the same ritual for celebrating the Eucharist.  The Mass will still have the same parts, the same patterns, and the same flow as it has had for the past several decades.  It is only the translation of the Latin that is changing.

The new translation seeks to correspond much more closely to the exact words and sentence structure of the Latin text.  At times, this results in a good and faithful rendering of the original meaning.  At other times it produces a rather awkward text in English which is difficult to proclaim and difficult to understand.  Most of those problems affect the texts which priests will proclaim rather than the texts that belong to the congregation as a whole.  It is to the congregation’s texts that I will address with each blog, in a repetitive basis until the start of Advent.

In the words of Vatican II’s Lumen Gentium, #11, the Eucharist is the “source and summit” of Christian life. Anything we can do to understand our liturgy more deeply will draw us closer to God.

The third form of the penitential rite, with the various invocations of Christ (e.g., “You came to call sinners”) will be much the same (not much of a change), though an option is added to conclude each invocation in Greek:

“Kyrie eleison, Christe eleison, Kyrie eleison,”

Which may be used instead of the English: “Lord, have mercy; Christ, have mercy; Lord, have mercy”, as it is presently.  The first two forms (found in the past two previous blogs) may conclude with this threefold litany too, either in English or in Greek.

Material from “Changing How We Pray”,
by Rev. Lawrence E. Mick

 

Т

 

A Franciscan’s Saint of the Day:  St. Conrad of Parzham (1818-1894)

Conrad spent most of his life as porter in Altoetting, Bavaria, letting people into the friary and indirectly encouraging them to let God into their lives.

His parents, Bartholomew and Gertrude Birndorfer, lived near Parzham, Bavaria.  In those days this region was recovering from the Napoleonic wars.  A lover of solitary prayer and a peacemaker as a young man,

Conrad joined the Capuchins as a brother.  He made his profession in 1852 and was assigned to the friary in Altoetting.  That city’s shrine to Mary was very popular; at the nearby Capuchin friary there was a lot of work for the porter, a job Conrad held for 41 years.

At first some of the other friars were jealous that such a young friar held this important job.  Conrad’s patience and holy life overcame their doubts.  As porter he dealt with many people, obtaining many of the friary supplies and generously providing for the poor who came to the door.  He treated them all with the courtesy Francis expected of his followers.

Conrad’s helpfulness was sometimes unnerving.  Once Father Vincent, seeking quiet to prepare a sermon, went up the bell tower of the church.  Conrad tracked him down when someone wanting to go to confession specifically requested Father Vincent.

Conrad also developed a special rapport with the children of the area.  He enthusiastically promoted the Seraphic Work of Charity, which aided neglected children.

Conrad spent hours in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament.  He regularly asked the Blessed Mother to intercede for him and for the many people he included in his prayers.  The ever-patient Conrad was canonized in 1934.

Comment:

As we can see from his life as well as his words, Conrad of Parzham lived a life that attracted others because of a special quality, something Chesterton alluded to when he wrote, “The moment we have a fixed heart we have a free hand” (Orthodoxy, p. 71).  If we want to understand Conrad, we have to know where he fixed his heart.  Because he was united to God in prayer, everyone felt at ease in Conrad’s presence.

Quote:

“It was God’s will that I should leave everything that was near and dear to me.  I thank him for having called me to religious life where I have found such peace and joy as I could never have found in the world.  My plan of life is chiefly this: to love and suffer, always meditating upon, adoring and admiring God’s unspeakable love for his lowliest creatures” (Letter of Saint Conrad).

Saint of the Day: Lives, Lessons and Feast
By Leonard Foley, O.F.M.;
revised by Pat McCloskey, O.F.M.
(From http://www.americancatholic.org website)

Т

Franciscan Formation Reflection:

Virtues II

What virtues were given to us with the Sacrament of Confirmation?  How often are we aware of trying to use them?

In our spiritual life, is it better (more wholesome) to concentrate on practicing virtues, rather than trying to eradicate vices? What is the practical difference?

Discuss one or two outstanding virtues that impress you about your favorite Saint…

How do these individual virtues compare to societal values today?

Т

Secular Franciscan Order (SFO)
Rule #’s 20 & 21 of 26:

20.  The Secular Franciscan Order is divided into fraternities of various levels — local, regional, national, and international. Each one has its own moral personality in the Church. These various fraternities are coordinated and united according to the norm of this rule and of the constitutions.

Т

21.  On various levels, each fraternity is animated and guided by a council and minister who are elected by the professed according to the constitutions. Their service, which lasts for a definite period, is marked by a ready and willing spirit and is a duty of responsibility to each member and to the community.

Within themselves the fraternities are structured in different ways according to the norm of the constitutions, according to the various needs of their members and their regions, and under the guidance of their respective council.

♫ “Sow a Seed, a Tiny Seed. Ray, a Drop of Golden Sun!” ♫ – Mark 4:1-20†


            

Today in Catholic History:

    
†   1109 – Death of Albericus of Côteaux, French saint
†   1564 – The Council of Trent issued its conclusions in “the Tridentinum”, establishing a distinction between Roman Catholicism and Protestantism.
†   1589 – Job is elected as Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia.
†   1722 – Birth of Alexander Carlyle, Scottish church leader (d. 1805)
†   1789 – John Odell signs contract for £336 to build St Peter’s church (Bronx)
†   1932 – Birth of George H Clements, first Roman Catholic Priest to adopt a child.
†   1962 – Bishop Burke (not Raymond Cardinal Burke) of Buffalo Catholic dioceses declares Chubby Checker’s “Twist” is impure & bans it from all Catholic schools
†   1976 – Belgium catholic elite start amnesty campaign for war criminals
†   1991 – Alfaro Vive guerrilla group of Ecuador gives arms to Catholic church
†   Feasts/Memorials: Timothy and Titus; Saint Paula; Saint Alberic; Saint Margaret of Hungary

(From the “On This Day” Blog Site
otday.wordpress.com) &/OR
“Today in Catholic History”
http://www.historyorb.com)

 

 

Quote or Joke of the Day:

 

 

 

  

Franciscan Formation Reflection:

 

This is a thirteen (13) part reflection on a letter from the SFO International Council website.  It is titled “An exhortation of the Church to the Secular Franciscan Order” by Benedetto Lino, OFS.  It can be read in full at http://www.ciofs.org/Y2009/a9ENrodelet.html
 

 (Continuation from Previous blog)

Part 08 of 13 Parts

John Paul II strongly advocated parrhesia:

“The parrhesia of faith must be matched by the boldness of reason” (Fides et Ratio, 48)

And the Holy Father Benedict XVI, then a Cardinal, commented thus on these words:

In a climate in which present day Catholicism risks being too acquiescent about conventional culture’s attitude to values and human rights, often considered variable “rules in a social game”, the Holy Father claims the right and duty of faith to speak strongly and clearly, to proclaim Christ as the ultimate and definitive truth of mankind and the world: with parrhesia, indeed. (from a talk by Card. Ratzinger on the Encyclical)

And on boldness, an exceptional Secular Franciscan, Bishop Don Tonino Bello, expresses himself thus:

“Boldness” does not mean rashness or foolhardiness, but parrhesia, i.e. freedom, frankness of speech, the active capacity to say things in the name of the Gospel. It does not mean to tone down the Gospel, to sweeten it or to dilute it to the point where it no longer says anything new.

(Continued on next published blog)

From “An exhortation of the Church
to the Secular Franciscan Order”
A commentary on Cardinal Franc Rodé’s letter
By:
Benedetto Lino OFS
SFO International Council Website
http://www.ciofs.org/Y2009/a9ENrodelet.html

 

 

 

Today’s reflection is about Jesus’ “Sower and the Seed” parable.

 

1 On another occasion he began to teach by the sea.  A very large crowd gathered around him so that he got into a boat on the sea and sat down.  And the whole crowd was beside the sea on land.  2 And he taught them at length in parables, and in the course of his instruction he said to them, 3 “Hear this!  A sower went out to sow.  4 And as he sowed, some seed fell on the path, and the birds came and ate it up.  5 Other seed fell on rocky ground where it had little soil. It sprang up at once because the soil was not deep.  6 And when the sun rose, it was scorched and it withered for lack of roots.  7 Some seed fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked it and it produced no grain.  8 And some seed fell on rich soil and produced fruit. It came up and grew and yielded thirty, sixty, and a hundredfold.”  9 He added, “Whoever has ears to hear ought to hear.”  10 And when he was alone, those present along with the Twelve questioned him about the parables.  11 He answered them, “The mystery of the kingdom of God has been granted to you.  But to those outside everything comes in parables, 12 so that ‘they may look and see but not perceive, and hear and listen but not understand, in order that they may not be converted and be forgiven.'”  13 Jesus said to them, “Do you not understand this parable? Then how will you understand any of the parables? 14 The sower sows the word.  15 These are the ones on the path where the word is sown.  As soon as they hear, Satan comes at once and takes away the word sown in them.  16 And these are the ones sown on rocky ground who, when they hear the word, receive it at once with joy.  17 But they have no root; they last only for a time.  Then when tribulation or persecution comes because of the word, they quickly fall away.  18 Those sown among thorns are another sort.  They are the people who hear the word, 19 but worldly anxiety, the lure of riches, and the craving for other things intrude and choke the word, and it bears no fruit.  20 But those sown on rich soil are the ones who hear the word and accept it and bear fruit thirty and sixty and a hundredfold.” (NAB Mark 4:1-20)

 

The word “parable” (Greek: “parabole”) is used as a term covering a wide variety of literary forms such as axioms, proverbs, similitude’s, and allegories.  In the New Testament, a “parable” primarily designates stories that illustrate comparisons between Christian truths and the events of everyday life at that time (and even now).  The key feature of today’s parable is the sowing of the seed, and its representation of the new initiative of the kingdom of God coming into the world.  

The use of parables was typical of Jesus’ mysterious and unfathomable method of teaching to the crowds.  Compare Jesus’ way of teaching to the masses with the interpretation that He presents to his disciples (a fewer number than the crowds) according to their capability to appreciate and comprehend His word. 

Parables were meant to focus and sharpen the curiosity of the individual “hearer”.  Today’s parable was a calculated homily appealing to a rural-oriented audience present at the seashore for Jesus’ lesson and sermon.  The local farmers knew the problems associated with trying to be successful in their particular farming environment.  After all, much of Palestine (even still today) is very rocky, with the top-soil that is more than often quite thin.  The Palestinian sun bears down on the earth relentlessly, often scorching and burning crops, and thus decreasing the usual bounty for the farmer.

Without any doubt from me (a self-proclaimed urban-city “born and bred” inhabitant expert), a large portion of the seed was scattered on ground not fit for growing dust, much less any plant.  Any gardener or farmer reading this reflection will recognize the importance of the need for good soil in order to supply nutrients for growth to any plant.  The “roots” of the plant are fundamentally necessary to get the food and water it needs.  Though much seed was used and wasted, the seed that fell on “good ground” (and also tended to with care) grew a good root system and bore a harvest of large bounty.  

The distinct and various types of soil conditions in today’s verses refer to the diverse range of responses to the word of God.  The climax of Jesus’ parable is the harvest of thirty, sixty, and a hundredfold, indicating the completion of the exponential expanding kingdom on earth and in heaven.  Thus, the present and future actions of God, – – from the initiation to the fulfillment of the kingdom, – – are presented through todays and others of Jesus’ parables and teachings.

The point of today’s parable is that in spite of some failures due to resistance, conflict, and indifference, Jesus’ message of the coming of His kingdom will still have a bountiful and enormous success.

 

It seems Jesus preferred teaching outdoors and usually by water, be it the Jordan River or the Sea of Galilee.  The crowd present must have been massive and swarming to require Jesus to take a position in a boat in order to teach.  Can you picture Jesus standing in a boat at the shore of the Sea of Galilee (If He walked on water, He certainly can stand in a boat!)?  Mark depicts Jesus teaching to the crowds from such a platform a few times throughout his book.   

“Once again he went out along the sea.  All the crowd came to him and he taught them.” (Mark 2:13)

 “Jesus withdrew toward the sea with his disciples. A large number of people (followed) from Galilee and from Judea.  Hearing what he was doing, a large number of people came to him also from Jerusalem, from Idumea, from beyond the Jordan, and from the neighborhood of Tyre and Sidon.” (Mark 3:7-8)

In contrast to His teaching near or on the Sea of Galilee, the mountain was the typical scene of Jesus at prayer and in the process of forming his disciples:

“And when he had taken leave of them, he went off to the mountain to pray.”  (Mark 6:46)

 “He went up the mountain and summoned those whom he wanted and they came to him.” (Mark 3:13; 9:2)

 “After six days Jesus took Peter, James, and John and led them up a high mountain apart by themselves.  And he was transfigured before them,” (Mark 3:13; 9:2)

 

The verses in today’s Gospel should be viewed against the concerns, unbelief, and opposition Jesus encountered in His earthly ministry.  With the background of today’s parable in mind, the distinction in Jesus’ method of teaching becomes clearer in His presenting the kingdom of God to the unbelieving crowd in one manner, and to His followers (His disciples) in another.  To the unbelievers, His message is presented in simple parables – – and the truth remains hidden.  For Jesus’ disciples, the parable is interpreted in their individual minds, heart, and souls, and the “mystery” is partially revealed to them by the Holy Spirit’s action, because of their faith.

 

There are different ways of accepting God’s word.  They all produce different kinds of fruit accordingly. The prejudiced individual shuts His mind to Jesus’ message.  This individual is not teachable and remains blind to the illumination of God’s word.

Then there is the shallow “hearer”. This person fails to fully understand and internalize the message.  In essence, he/she lacks a “depth” of understanding.  At first, he/she responds with enthusiasm and passion.  However, this zeal wears off and their minds seem to wander to something else.  Some quit when God’s mission gets too hard for them (“when the going gets hard …”).  And, even some (if not most I believe) just drift away, distracted by other “priorities” in their earthly world.

Another type of “hearer” is the person who is just too busy to pray, study, and meditate on God’s word.  His/her ability to accept God’s word is hardened.  His/her brain, heart, and soul are “rock hard”, and cannot be penetrated.

Finally, there is the individual whose mind is open to God’s word.  This person is willing to listen, learn, and accept Jesus’ message fully.  He/she allows the Holy Spirit to dwell in and through them. 

God gives grace to those who hunger for His word that they may understand His will, and have the strength to live according to His will and plan.  Do you hunger for God’s word; do you want to grow in God’s love?

 

My wife planted a small garden last year.  As always, she started by tilling the earth with her tiny two-tine tiller.  Tilling this year consisted of her little beast of burden buried somewhere in our garden shed; trying to get it started (with lots of prayers and frustrations); and then breaking up the earth to prepare it for the seeds.  She planted a variety of seeds and starter plants in a small patch of ground: three types of tomatoes; four types of “squash;” three types of melons, and even a couple of sunflowers just for fun.  Weeding the garden was a major challenge and sometimes unsuccessful for her.

The crops were surprisingly bountiful (especially the squashes) as compared to other years.  I even experimented once with “her” produce, and made “No-noodle vegetable lasagna” wherein I substituted thinly sliced zucchini instead of the usual pasta noodles.  All the veggies (except the mushrooms) came from my wife’s garden.  We had so much in fact, I actually made two big pans; sharing one with our neighboring friends.  With great humility, this meal (MY RECIPE AND CREATION!!) was a huge success!

What does my wife’s garden have to do with finding God?  For me, this was the meaning of Jesus’ parable about throwing some seeds around on the ground.  My wife searching for the tools to do the job, represents finding the time to look for God: finding Him in prayer and adoration; the Sacraments and sacramental’s; Reconciliation; and most importantly – – in the Eucharist.

The breaking up of the ground represents our submission to the Holy Spirit, allowing Him to live in and with us, and to work through us.  Our lives (the soil) has to be prepared so that the Holy Spirit can take a strong hold and “root” in us, allowing the Holy Spirit to grow in, through, and out of us. 

Most of my wife’s seeds were planted in fertile soil, but some were eaten by birds, squirrels and rabbits, and even our dogs; and sadly, some never germinated.  I believe this is a representation of the same thing happening in each of us.  Being sinners, and definitely imperfect, the seeds of faith sometime never germinate within us, and some seeds of faith are destroyed by our vices and sins.  Yet, some seeds germinate and take a good strong root within us, if we allow.  In fertile soil, a well-prepared soul in this case, the seeds of God’s grace grow to fruition and sprout great graces (the vegetables) for the harvesting.

Some of the seeds in my wife’s garden grew surrounded by weeds.  When the vegetables were ready to be picked, we had to separate them from the tangled weeds to gather them.  They were still perfectly good to eat, even though they were not necessarily in pristine soil and conditions.  The same is true with our graces in God’s Kingdom.  Some of our graces are planted in fertile soil, but due to many circumstances weeds grow around our faith, trust, and love in and for God.  These circumstances (weeds) could include drugs, mental problems, petty crimes, bad family life, insecurity, or any other calamity that could affect someone’s spiritual life.  Even though you may be in this “weedy” soil, good produce is still possible and can be harvested from you.  With God all things are definitely possible, even with all the baggage we oftentimes carry.  Please allow God to harvest you from the weeds of life.  Jesus’ parable of the “sower and the seed” definitely gives hope and encouragement to all that listens to His word.

Remember, we are all unique.  No one path to God’s Kingdom is identical to another’s.  Each of us is a unique and “one-of-a-kind” individual, with unique and individual experiences.   God has a purpose for your life being different from any others.  I also believe that God gives you all the graces and talents you need to make that journey on the path that you must take to Him.

Maybe the parable today actually describes the different times in our individual lives as much as the different attitudes of the people we meet.  Though I am always open and in dire need of hearing God’s word, I seem to truly receive His word as eagerly as I should – – only some of the time!  I further believe this is truly human nature; an effect of our original sin on our soul.  God knows this as well – – Heck, after all, doesn’t He know everything?  Even though I may not be completely open to God’s word today, He also knows I will be more open, more attentive, and more determined in His word “tomorrow”.  God, “the sower”, will keep throwing me some of His seeds (His graces), and I know at least some will take root through His divine mercy and love.

 

St. Francis, while praying before the San Damiano Crucifix in the little town of Assisi in Italy, heard God tell him to “rebuild my house which is falling in ruins.”  Being a man trained in practical business matters from his father, St. Francis understood that God had told him that the old chapel he was praying in, which was now decrepit and literally falling apart, and – – brick by brick, – – needed to be repaired.

Francis did exactly that; he rebuilt that small Chapel and several others as well in his lifetime.  In addition, St. Francis also helped rebuild the entire Catholic Church.  He started three separate Franciscan Orders of priests, brothers, and nuns that eventually (and rapidly) spread world-wide; and even into the Anglican and Orthodox Churches.  God’s seed was planted with St. Francis in very fertile soil, and grew to an immense size, bearing much great fruit for God and His kingdom.   Are there any seeds waiting to sprout in you that could equal or surpass St. Francis’ bounty?  Ask God!

 

Saint Francis’ Vocation Prayer

“Most High, Glorious God,
enlighten the darkness of our minds.
Give us a right faith, a firm hope and a perfect charity,
so that we may always and in all things act according to Your Holy Will.  Amen.”

 

Pax et Bonum
Dan Halley, SFO

 

*****

 

A Franciscan’s Saint of the Day:  Sts. Timothy and Titus

 

Timothy (d. 97?): What we know from the New Testament of Timothy’s life makes it sound like that of a modern harried bishop. He had the honor of being a fellow apostle with Paul, both sharing the privilege of preaching the gospel and suffering for it.

Timothy had a Greek father and a Jewish mother named Eunice. Being the product of a “mixed” marriage, he was considered illegitimate by the Jews. It was his grandmother, Lois, who first became Christian. Timothy was a convert of Paul around the year 47 and later joined him in his apostolic work. He was with Paul at the founding of the Church in Corinth. During the 15 years he worked with Paul, he became one of his most faithful and trusted friends. He was sent on difficult missions by Paul—often in the face of great disturbance in local Churches which Paul had founded.

Timothy was with Paul in Rome during the latter’s house arrest. At some period Timothy himself was in prison (Hebrews 13:23). Paul installed him as his representative at the Church of Ephesus.

Timothy was comparatively young for the work he was doing. (“Let no one have contempt for your youth,” Paul writes in 1 Timothy 4:12a.) Several references seem to indicate that he was timid. And one of Paul’s most frequently quoted lines was addressed to him: “Stop drinking only water, but have a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent illnesses” (1 Timothy 5:23).

Titus (d. 94?): Titus has the distinction of being a close friend and disciple of Paul as well as a fellow missionary. He was Greek, apparently from Antioch. Even though Titus was a Gentile, Paul would not let him be forced to undergo circumcision at Jerusalem. Titus is seen as a peacemaker, administrator, great friend. Paul’s second letter to Corinth affords an insight into the depth of his friendship with Titus, and the great fellowship they had in preaching the gospel: “When I went to Troas…I had no relief in my spirit because I did not find my brother Titus. So I took leave of them and went on to Macedonia…. For even when we came into Macedonia, our flesh had no rest, but we were afflicted in every way—external conflicts, internal fears. But God, who encourages the downcast, encouraged us by the arrival of Titus…” (2 Corinthians 2:12a, 13; 7:5-6).

When Paul was having trouble with the community at Corinth, Titus was the bearer of Paul’s severe letter and was successful in smoothing things out. Paul writes he was strengthened not only by the arrival of Titus but also “by the encouragement with which he was encouraged in regard to you, as he told us of your yearning, your lament, your zeal for me, so that I rejoiced even more…. And his heart goes out to you all the more, as he remembers the obedience of all of you, when you received him with fear and trembling” (2 Corinthians 7:7a, 15).

The Letter to Titus addresses him as the administrator of the Christian community on the island of Crete, charged with organizing it, correcting abuses and appointing presbyter-bishops.

Comment:

In Titus we get another glimpse of life in the early Church: great zeal in the apostolate, great communion in Christ, great friendship. Yet always there is the problem of human nature and the unglamorous details of daily life: the need for charity and patience in “quarrels with others, fears within myself,” as Paul says. Through it all, the love of Christ sustained them. At the end of the Letter to Titus, Paul says that when the temporary substitute comes, “hurry to me.”

Quote:

“But when the kindness and generous love of God our Savior appeared, not because of any righteous deeds we had done but because of his mercy, he saved us through the bath of rebirth and renewal by the holy Spirit, whom he richly poured out on us through Jesus Christ our savior, so that we might be justified by his grace and become heirs in hope of eternal life. This saying is trustworthy” (Titus 3:4-8).

Patron Saint of Stomach disorders

Saint of the Day: Lives, Lessons and Feast
By Leonard Foley, O.F.M.;
revised by Pat McCloskey, O.F.M.
(From http://www.americancatholic.org website)

 
    

Secular Franciscan Order (SFO) Rule #’s 25 & 26 of 26:

 

25.  Regarding expenses necessary for the life of the fraternity and the needs of worship, of the apostolate, and of charity, all the brothers and sisters should offer a contribution according to their means. Local fraternities should contribute toward the expenses of the higher fraternity councils.

 

 

26.  As a concrete sign of communion and co-responsibility, the councils on various levels, in keeping with the constitutions, shall ask for suitable and well prepared religious for spiritual assistance. They should make this request to the superiors of the four religious Franciscan families, to whom the Secular Fraternity has been united for centuries.

To promote fidelity to the charism as well as observance of the rule and to receive greater support in the life of the fraternity, the minister or president, with the consent of the council, should take care to ask for a regular pastoral visit by the competent religious superiors as well as for a fraternal visit from those of the higher fraternities, according to the norm of the constitutions.

“Are You a Good Seed, Or a Bad Seed; Let’s See What Sprouts!” – Mt 13:1-9†


It is a beautiful Wednesday in the St. Louis Area of the Country.  I am on day #9 of my yearly “Total Consecration to Jesus through Mary” novena, and am thoroughly enjoying the journey and reflections.

Today’s Gospel reading is one of my favorite in the Bible.  I hope you enjoy the reflection.  It is a very positive one for all Catholics.  Please pass this blog on to your friends and even your ENEMIES; all are welcomed.

 

Today in Catholic History:

†   1515 – Birth of Philip Neri, Italian churchman (d. 1595)
†  Liturgical Feasts: Saint Arbogastus, bishop of Strasburg, confessor [Basel, Constance, Strassburg]; Saint Daniel; Saint Lawrence of Brindisi, priest, Doctor of the Church; Saint Praxedes (Praxidis); Saint Victor of Marseilles, and companions, martyrs [Trier, southern France; Paris]

 

Quote or Joke of the Day:

WARNING: Exposure to the Son may prevent burning.

 

Today’s reflection is about the sowing of seeds parable:
    

That same day Jesus went out of the house and sat beside the lake.  Such great crowds gathered around him that he got into a boat and sat there, while the whole crowd stood on the beach.  And he told them many things in parables, saying: ‘Listen! A sower went out to sow.  And as he sowed, some seeds fell on the path, and the birds came and ate them up.  Other seeds fell on rocky ground, where they did not have much soil, and they sprang up quickly, since they had no depth of soil.  But when the sun rose, they were scorched; and since they had no root, they withered away.  Other seeds fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked them.  Other seeds fell on good soil and brought forth grain, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty.  Let anyone with ears listen!’  (NRSV Mt 13:1-9)

 

In Matthew’s Gospel, this is the beginning of Jesus’ third time making a public dissertation or sermon.   It seems Jesus preferred teaching outdoors, and usually by water; be it the Jordan River, or the Sea (a lake) of Galilee.  The crowd present must have been massive and pressing to require Jesus to take a position in a boat in order to teach. 

In Palestine, sowing often preceded plowing, with much of the seed scattered on ground being unsuitable for the conditions present.  Yet while much was wasted, the seed that fell on the good ground bore grain in extraordinarily large amounts.  The point of this parable is to show that in spite of failure due to opposition and/or indifference, the message of Jesus about the coming of the Kingdom of God will be enormously successful.

My wife planted a small garden this year, and she started as always by tilling the earth.  Tilling this year consisted of finding the tiny two-tined tiller buried somewhere in our garden shed; trying to get it started, with lots of prayers and frustrations; and then breaking up the earth to prepare it for the seeds.  She planted a variety of seeds and starter plants in this small patch of ground: three types of tomatoes; four types of “squash;” three types of melons, and even a couple of sunflowers just for fun.  Weeding the garden has, at times, been a major challenge and sometimes unsuccessful for us.

The crops are surprisingly bountiful this year, compared to others.  I recently made “No-noodle vegetable lasagna” wherein I substituted thinly sliced zucchini instead of the usual pasta noodles.  All the veggies (except mushrooms) came from my wife’s garden.  We had so much in fact, I actually made two big pans; sharing one with our neighborhood friends.  With great humility, this meal was a huge success!

What does my wife’s garden have to do with finding God?  This was the meaning of Jesus’ parable about throwing seeds around for me.  My wife searching for the tools to do the job, represents finding the time to look for God, and to find Him in prayer, adoration, the Sacraments and sacramental’s, Reconciliation, and most importantly, in the Eucharist. 

The breaking up of the ground represents our submission to the Holy Spirit, allowing Him to live in us, and to work through us.  Our lives (the soil) have to be prepared so that the Holy Spirit can take root in us and grow.  

Most of my wife’s seeds were planted in fertile soil, but some were eaten by birds, squirrels and rabbits, and even our dogs; and some never germinated.  I believe this is the same with each of us.  Being sinners, and definitely imperfect, the seeds in us sometime never germinate, and some are destroyed by our vices and sins.  But some germinate and take a good strong root in us.  If in fertile soil, a well-prepared soul in this case, the seeds of God’s grace grow to fruition and sprout great graces (the vegetables) for the harvesting. 

Some of the seeds in my wife’s garden grew surrounded by weeds.  When the vegetables were ready to be picked, we had to separate them from the weeds in order to gather them.  They were still perfectly good to eat, even though they were not in pristine soil and conditions.  The same is true with us in God’s Kingdom.  Some of us are planted in fertile soil, but due to circumstances many weeds grow around us.  These weeds could be drugs, mental problems, petty crimes, bad family life, insecurity, or any other calamity that could affect someone’s spiritual life.  Even though you may be in this “weedy” soil, good produce is still possible and can be harvested.  With God, all things are definitely possible, even with all the baggage we sometimes carry.  Please allow God to harvest you from the weeds of life.  Jesus’ parable of the “sower and the seed” definitely gives hope and encouragement to all that listens to His word.

Remember, we are all unique.  No one path to God’s Kingdom is identical to another’s; each is a “one-of-a-kind” experience.   God had a purpose for your life being different from any others.  I also believe that God gives us all the graces and talents we need to make that journey on the path we must take to Him.

The word “parable” (In Greek: “parabole”) is used to translate the Hebrew “mashal:” a word that covers a variety of oral and written literature such as maxims, axioms, proverbs, fable’s, similitude’s, and allegories.  In the New Testament the same word primarily designates stories that illustrates comparisons between Christian truths, and the events of everyday life.  Sometimes these events have an element that is quite different from the usual experience.  An example is found in the upcoming Matthew 13:33 where the enormous amount of dough, in the “parable of the yeast,” is enough to feed one hundred people; and used to illustrate the greatness of the Kingdom of God’s effect on humanity. 

Parables were meant to sharpen the curiosity of the hearer.  This parable was a calculated discourse to appeal to a rural-oriented audience present for Jesus’ lesson and sermon this day.  The local farmers knew the problems associated with trying to be successful in their environment.  Much of Palestine is very rocky, with the top-soil often quite thin, and the Palestinian sun often scorched and burned crops, thus decreasing the usual bounty of the farmer. 

St. Francis, while praying before the San Damiano Crucifix in that little town of Assisi in Italy, heard God tell him to “rebuild my house, which is falling in ruins.”  Francis, being man trained in practical business matters from his father, understood what God had told him to mean that the old chapel, he was praying in, which was decrepit and literally falling apart brick by brick, and needed to be repaired.

Francis did exactly that; he rebuilt that church, and several others.  In addition, he also rebuilt the entire Catholic Church by starting three separate Franciscan Orders of priests, brothers, and nuns that have spread world-wide; and even into the Anglican and Orthodox Churches.  The seed was planted with Francis in very fertile soil, and grew to an immense size, bearing much great fruit.   Is there are seeds waiting to sprout in you that could equal or surpass Francis’ bounty?  Ask God.

 

“Saint Francis Prayer”

“Lord, make me an instrument of Your peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy.

O, Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love; For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; it is in dying that we are born again to eternal life.  Amen”

 

Pax et Bonum
Dan Halley, SFO

*****

Franciscan Saint of the Day:  St. Lawrence of Brindisi 1559-1619
 

Lawrence was one of the greatest ornaments of the Capuchin Order, and deserved well of both Church and State at the beginning of the 17th century. He was born at Brindisi in the kingdom of Naples in 1559.

From his tenderest years he evinced rare gifts of nature and grace. In remembrance of Jesus in the Temple at 12 years of age, a custom prevails in Italy at Christmas time permitting boys to preach in public. Lawrence was only six years old when he preached in the cathedral of his native town with such force and point that his audience was deeply affected and many entered upon a more Christian life.

Lawrence entered the Capuchin friary at Verona when he was only 16 years of age. He distinguished himself from the very beginning as a model of perfection. He was punctual at all the community exercises, perfect in his submission to superiors, and full of respect and charity towards his brethren.

When his novitiate was over, he continued to pursue his studies. He was very successful in the study of philosophy and theology, and acquired so thorough a command of foreign languages that he was able to preach in French, Spanish, German, Greek, and even in Hebrew. He ascribed his success not so much to his talents as to the special help he received from Mary, the Seat of Wisdom, whom he honored with tender devotion.

With such accomplishments Father Lawrence started out on a highly fruitful missionary life. At first he visited the various cities in Italy; Venice, Pavia, Verona, Padua, Naples, where his labors were blessed with remarkable success. He was then called to Rome, where he was entrusted with the conversion of the Jews. His thorough knowledge of the Hebrew language won for him the esteem of the rabbis, and his gentle manner led many an Israelite to baptism.

In 1598 Father Lawrence was sent to Germany with eleven other friars to establish Capuchin convents there and to counteract the heresy of Luther, which was at that time gaining a foothold in Austria.

Emperor Rudolph II entrusted to our saint the task of organizing a crusade against the Turks, who were threatening to invade the whole Christian Occident. Father Lawrence, who loved seclusion, was now obliged to visit the principal cities of Germany to negotiate the cause with the princes, and preach it to the people. Due to his wisdom and holiness, which almighty God permitted him to manifest in astonishing ways, his efforts proved successful.

While he was saying holy Mass in Munich in the chapel of the duke of Bavaria, our Lord appeared after the elevation in the form of a resplendent Child, who lovingly caressed the saint. Frequently he was so affected during the celebration of holy Mass that he shed copious tears. Altar linens thus moistened with his tears were later used on the sick, and they were cured as were the faithful by the kerchiefs of St. Paul.

Father Lawrence was made the chief chaplain of the powerful army of Archduke Matthias, which went to Hungary in 1601 to war against the Turks. Although quite crippled with rheumatism, he mounted his horse and, crucifix in hand, rode at the head of the troops to the battlefield. The first sight of the enemy was most discouraging, for their position was so favorable and their number so superior that the most stout-hearted officers despaired of victory. But in the name of the God of battles Father Lawrence promised victory to the Christians and inspired them all with fiery courage. The enemy was completely routed.

Lawrence now returned to Italy where he hoped he might again serve God in his beloved solitude. But the general chapter of the order elected him vicar general. He was obliged in obedience to accept this heavy burden. In this high office he proved a charitable and vigilant pastor to his brethren. When his term expired, the pope again sent him to Germany, this time on an errand of peace, to reconcile the Archduke Matthias with his brother, the emperor. Again he was successful.

After he returned to Italy, the kingdom of Naples, his native land, was in need of his services. This kingdom which at that time belonged to Phillip III of Spain, was governed by a viceroy who cruelly oppressed the people. The only hope lay in presenting the people’s grievances to the king through Father Lawrence. The latter sympathized with the people and journeyed to Spain, only to learn that the king was then in Portugal. So on he went to Lisbon, where he pleaded the people’s cause and obtained the dismissal of the viceroy.

But this errand of charity cost Lawrence his life. He fell very ill at Lisbon. He knew that his end was drawing near and told his companions so. After devoutly receiving the last sacraments, he fell into ecstasy, during which he went to the sweet embrace of his Lord on the feast of St. Magdalen, July 22, 1619. Pope Pius VI beatified him in 1783, and on December 8, 1881, Pope Leo XIII canonized him. In December 1958 Pope John XXIII signed a decree declaring St. Lawrence to be a Doctor of the Church.

The Franciscan Book of Saints,
ed. by Marion Habig, ofm.,
© 1959 Franciscan Herald Press
(From http://www.franciscan-sfo.org website)

Secular Franciscan Order (SFO) Rule #21:
 

On various levels, each fraternity is animated and guided by a council and minister who are elected by the professed according to the constitutions.

Their service, which lasts for a definite period, is marked by a ready and willing spirit and is a duty of responsibility to each member and to the community.

Within themselves the fraternities are structured in different ways according to the norm of the constitutions, according to the various needs of their members and their regions, and under the guidance of their respective council.