“Capernaum – If You Can Make it Big There, You Can Make It Big Any Where! – – OR – – Jesus Loved To ‘Stir the Pot!’” – Mark 1: 29-39†


 

It is exactly one year ago today that Haiti experienced the “Great Earthquake”.  The challenges are still ever present throughout this poor and devastated country.  Please remember them in your prayers.  They are still hurting in all but faith!

            

Today in Catholic History:


    
†  689 – Death of Benedict Biscop, English saint
†  1167 – Death of Aelred of Hexham/Rievaulx, English abbot/saint, at age of about 56
†  1390 – Death of Peter van Herenthals, Dutch theologist/church historian, at age 67
†  1598 – Pope Clement VIII seizes duchy of Ferrara on death of Alfonso
†  1700 – Death of Marguerite Bourgeoys, saint (b. 1620)
†  1777 – Mission Santa Clara de Asís is founded in what is now Santa Clara, California.
†  1817 – Death of Juan Andres, Spanish Jesuit (b. 1740)
†  1781 – Death of Richard Challoner, English Catholic prelate (b. 1691)
†  1915 – Birth of Joseph-Aurèle Plourde, Catholic archbishop of Ottawa
†  1995 – Pope John Paul II begins visit to SE Asia
†  2006 – Turkey releases Mehmet Ali Ağca from jail after he served 25 years for shooting Pope John Paul II.

(From the “On This Day” Blog Site
otday.wordpress.com) &/OR
“Today in Catholic History”
http://www.historyorb.com)

 

 

Quote or Joke of the Day:

 

The good Lord didn’t create anything without a purpose, but mosquitoes come close.

 

Franciscan Formation Reflection:

 

 

This is a thirteen (13) part reflection on a letter from the SFO International Council website.  It is titled “An exhortation of the Church to the Secular Franciscan Order” by Benedetto Lino, OFS.  It can be read in full at http://www.ciofs.org/Y2009/a9ENrodelet.html

 

(Continuation from Previous blog)

Part 04 of 13 Parts

 

The Cardinal’s letter underlines some key points and expresses a strong exhortation, centered on the evangelical word parrhesia in combination with the missionary mandate, to all Secular Franciscans, singularly and collectively as an Order in all its forms: local, regional, national and worldwide.

The key points are the following:

  • THE IMPORTANCE OF A TRULY FRATERNAL LIFE
  • THE REDISCOVERY  AND CONSOLIDATION OF ONE’S OWN IDENTITY AND MISSION  IN THE CHURCH AND IN THE WORLD
  •  AWARENESS OF BEING PRESENT ALL OVER THE WORLD, EVEN WHERE THE CHURCH IS PRESECUTED
  • INVOLVEMENT WITH AND SUPPORT OF FRANCISCAN YOUTH

 

(Continued on next published blog)

From “An exhortation of the Church
to the Secular Franciscan Order”
A commentary on Cardinal Franc Rodé’s letter
By:
Benedetto Lino OFS
SFO International Council Website
http://www.ciofs.org/Y2009/a9ENrodelet.html

 

 

  

 

 

Today’s reflection is about Jesus healing Peter’s Mother-In-Law, His curing of many others, and expansion of His mission on earth.

 

29 On leaving the synagogue he entered the house of Simon and Andrew with James and John.  30 Simon’s mother-in-law lay sick with a fever.  They immediately told him about her.  31 He approached, grasped her hand, and helped her up.  Then the fever left her and she waited on them.  32 When it was evening, after sunset, they brought to him all who were ill or possessed by demons.  33 The whole town was gathered at the door.  34 He cured many who were sick with various diseases, and he drove out many demons, not permitting them to speak because they knew him.  35 Rising very early before dawn, he left and went off to a deserted place, where he prayed.  36 Simon and those who were with him pursued him 37 and on finding him said, “Everyone is looking for you.”  38 He told them, “Let us go on to the nearby villages that I may preach there also. For this purpose have I come.”  39 So he went into their synagogues, preaching and driving out demons throughout the whole of Galilee.  (NAB Mark 1: 29-39)

 

Each of the Gospel writers tells Jesus’ life, mission, and love for us in just a little different way or focus.  In today’s Gospel story, Mark shows Jesus as being close and easily approachable to us.  Jesus is found to be deeply and truly concerned for the well-being of others.  Mark present’s the kingdom of God as a sudden, surprising, and somewhat unsettling happening.  Finally, with Mark, Jesus is not the humble, gentle teacher of serene peace we often picture in our minds.  Rather, Jesus is pictured as an unstoppable “disturber” of the status quo; Jesus “stirred the proverbial pot” in Mark’s viewpoint!

In Contrast, Matthew highlights the fulfillment of Hebrew prophesies in relation to the coming Messiah.  And Luke focuses on the value of community and fellowship, with Jesus as the head and focus of the community.

Today’s reading is told as an “eyewitness account”, or “third person” type of story.  Jesus was still in Capernaum where He had been teaching.  He performed an exorcism in the synagogue that could not be kept quiet from the general population.  Jesus was apparently teaching and/or praying, when He was interrupted and received word of Simon [Peter] having a very sick Mother-In-Law in his home.  (Was it a penance or plenary indulgence for Simon Peter to have his In-Laws living with him?)

Jesus leaves the synagogue with James and John (the brothers’ fishermen) and “entered the house of Simon and Andrew”.  An EWTN special recently showed that the synagogue was literally only a few yards from Simon Peter’s house.  Thus, people that were listening to Jesus teaching at the time of His interruption could easily follow Him to the house.  Others leaving the synagogue a little later would see the group of men looking in the door and windows of Simon’s house and then possibly also gathered around, just to see what was happening and what all the commotion was about.

Per today’s reading, Simon was obviously married.  Just as in my marriage, I bet he “wore the pants” in his home.  And just as in my marriage, his wife told him which ones to put on!  Do you wonder if his wife traveled with her husband, Simon Peter, on his journey with Jesus?  I believe so, as evidenced is in what Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians:

Do we not have the right to take along a Christian wife, as do the rest of the apostles, and the brothers of the Lord, and Cephas?” (1 Cor 9:5)

“Simon’s mother-in-law lay sick with a fever.”  We do not know the cause of the fever, but fever in adults is usually due to an infection of some type.  Remember, there were no modern-day antibiotics in Jesus’ time, so an infection of such nature as to cause one to be bed-ridden routinely ended with the death of the person.  Jesus, – – the human flesh and bones “Christ” – – destroyed the power of sin and death then, now, and forever and ever.  Amen!

Jesus “approached, grasped her hand, and helped her up.  Then the fever left her and she waited on them.”  Simon’s and Andrew’s “Momma” was suddenly, completely, and miraculously cured through the actions and laying of hands of Jesus Christ.  Jesus fulfilled prophesy from Isaiah, in part, in performing this action:

“Our infirmities He bore, our sufferings He endured.”  (Isaiah 53:4)

The “laying of hands” is an important and special sacramental within the Catholic Church.  The Priest and Bishop (in Persona Christi) lays his hands on the head of the sick in a “Healing” service, and the Sacrament of the Sick; and the Holy Spirit, through the Bishop, bestows a special mark on the soul of the newly ordained priest with the laying on of his hands.

Can you even imagine Jesus standing next to your bed?  I don’t believe anyone would just lie there if they saw “God” standing before them – – with a smile on His face!  I think anyone would immediately spring out of bed (if at all possible) in His presence.  I can picture my reaction to this possible event vividly.  I would jump out of bed, give Him a big hug, and then fall to my knees to kiss His feet.  I so love the Lord, and cannot wait to see Him (but I’m not rushing things either)!

 

 

Jesus had already healed a man in the synagogue, and now He heals Simon’s mother-in-law.  That “evening” He continues to heal large numbers of sick and possessed people from the town of Capernaum and surrounding areas.  To see Jesus and what He was doing “the whole town gathered at the door” of Simon and Andrew.  There was no keeping Jesus’ ministry and power quiet to the masses, and word spread like “fire”.  (Could this be the Holy Spirit working already?  I believe so.)  

Simon’s and Andrew’s home became the “headquarters” for Jesus’ public ministry.  Can you picture Jesus having a small office in a back room of the Simon Peters house, a calendar on the wall, a desk with an in/out basket set on top of it, and memo pad at hand?  I so love picturing what it was truly like being with Jesus in His HUMAN and divine natures.  I bet He had one helluva sense of humor!! (Excuse the sort-of-pun.)

The first (1st) to know of Jesus’ divinity and power were not these pious people of a small fishing village in Galilee called Capernaum.  In actuality, it was Satan and the evil spirits processing the inhabitants in the area.  These “spirits” and supernatural immoral beings know fully and truly who Jesus is, even before His actions in this small fishing town.  The followers and disciples of Jesus have yet to get a fuller and more complete picture of Jesus.  Then they will “know” Him as the dying and rising “Messiah”.  I believe this is why Mark wrote:

“He cured many who were sick with various diseases, and He drove out many demons, not permitting them to speak because they knew Him.” 

 

 

After all of this excitement, teaching, and healing Jesus felt it necessary to withdraw temporarily.  He needed some quiet time, and some “one-on-one” time with His heavenly Father.  “Rising very early before dawn, he left and went off to a deserted place, where he prayed.”  

One of my favorite things to do when possible (and always on vacation or retreat) is to wake early, sit outside, and pray my morning office and rosary while observing nature around me.  All my senses become alive, and I feel so much closer to God in these special times.

 

 

Jesus was on “God time” and knew of the plan of salvation that He had embarked on.  On the other hand, His disciples really had no clue of their futures.  (I wonder if they would have stayed with Him if they knew of their future fate?!)  They thought Jesus could “make it big” in Capernaum, and were concerned with His leaving.  So, “Simon and those who were with him pursued him and on finding him said, ‘Everyone is looking for you.’”  Simon and others wanted Jesus to do more in Capernaum.

Jesus wanted to broaden His Mission of preaching and teaching to the whole of Galilee.  In saying, “Let us go on to the nearby villages that I may preach there also”, Jesus was not throwing His mission to Capernaum in the trashcan, or even saying that His mission in Capernaum was complete.  Rather, Jesus wanted to spread His mission of proclaiming the salvation and kingdom of God to as many as He could possibly do in His human form.  Jesus was planting as many mustard seeds of faith as He could!  “So he went into their synagogues, preaching and driving out demons throughout the whole of Galilee.”  

 

 

Today, there are three versions – – three Gospels – – for this one story.  Each one is a little different and unique: a different focus or viewpoint about Jesus’ life and His love for us in regard to the inhabitants of Capernaum.  God gave us the 73 books of the Bible – – His living Word – – our Holy Scripture.  With, in, and through it, we can grow closer to Jesus and grow to love Him even more!  We can get an even richer and fuller understanding of Jesus through the “eyes” of four “inspired” writers of the Gospels.  So, don’t just read one Gospel for the day; find the same story in each Gospel, and read them together to get a more complete picture.

Yesterday’s Gospel reading, along with todays, totals 24 hours in Jesus’ life.  When you read a Gospel like this one, or the similar one’s in the other three Gospels, you see how Jesus spent His time.  You see how humble, generous, and loving He was.  Do you wish to walk in Jesus’ path and be like Him?  Well, you cannot walk in His path for He was perfect and divine, and WE ARE NOT.  But, Jesus most certainly can walk with you in your own path to salvation, if you allow Him!  What better of a travel companion can any have!!!

Do you ask Jesus to heal you; to heal your family, friends and others; to heal your community, your country, and your world? God’s power to heal restores us to health physically, mentally, and spiritually.  His power to heal also draws us to serve and care others in need (which is everyone).  There is nothing that God cannot handle or do! He can do anything, including the impossible!!  So take you’re your problems, take your concerns, take your infirmities to Jesus, through prayer, faith, and trust – – and He will help you!!  Caution: It may not be the help you expected, but it will be the help you need!

 

 

Prayer in Time of Trial

 

“St. Maximilian [Kolbe], we thank God for the good example of your life.

You teach us to love and thus overcome our hatred of those who harm us.  You teach us to hope and thus conquer the depression and despair that so often overwhelm us.  You teach us courage by your daring enterprises for God and sacrifice of self as the Immaculata’s instrument.

Pray for us now that Mary, our Mother; and Jesus, her Son will bring to our troubled spirit peace, calm, and joy.  Amen.”

(Spend two minutes thinking of the good things that God has done for you during your lifetime.)

 

Pax et Bonum
Dan Halley, SFO

 

*****

 

A Franciscan’s Saint of the Day:  St. Marguerite Bourgeoys (1620-1700)

 

“God closes a door and then opens a window,” people sometimes say when dealing with their own disappointment or someone else’s. That was certainly true in Marguerite’s case. Children from European as well as Native American backgrounds in seventeenth-century Canada benefited from her great zeal and unshakable trust in God’s providence.

Born the sixth of 12 children in Troyes, France, Marguerite at the age of 20 believed that she was called to religious life. Her applications to the Carmelites and Poor Clares were unsuccessful. A priest friend suggested that perhaps God had other plans for her.

In 1654, the governor of the French settlement in Canada visited his sister, an Augustinian canoness in Troyes. Marguerite belonged to a sodality connected to that convent. The governor invited her to come to Canada and start a school in Ville-Marie (eventually the city of Montreal). When she arrived, the colony numbered 200 people with a hospital and a Jesuit mission chapel.

Soon after starting a school, she realized her need for coworkers. Returning to Troyes, she recruited a friend, Catherine Crolo, and two other young women. In 1667 they added classes at their school for Indian children. A second trip to France three years later resulted in six more young women and a letter from King Louis XIV, authorizing the school. The Congregation of Notre Dame was established in 1676 but its members did not make formal religious profession until 1698 when their Rule and constitutions were approved.

Marguerite established a school for Indian girls in Montreal. At the age of 69, she walked from Montreal to Quebec in response to the bishop’s request to establish a community of her sisters in that city. By the time she died, she was referred to as the “Mother of the Colony.” Marguerite was canonized in 1982.

Comment:

It’s easy to become discouraged when plans that we think that God must endorse are frustrated. Marguerite was called not to be a cloistered nun but to be a foundress and an educator. God had not ignored her after all.

Quote:

In his homily at her canonization, Pope John Paul II said, “…in particular, she [Marguerite] contributed to building up that new country [Canada], realizing the determining role of women, and she diligently strove toward their formation in a deeply Christian spirit.” He noted that she watched over her students with affection and confidence “in order to prepare them to become wives and worthy mothers, Christians, cultured, hardworking, radiant mothers.”

Saint of the Day: Lives, Lessons and Feast
By Leonard Foley, O.F.M.;
revised by Pat McCloskey, O.F.M.
(From http://www.americancatholic.org website)

 
    

Secular Franciscan Order (SFO) Rule #’s 12 & 13 of 26: 

12.  Witnessing to the good yet to come and obligated to acquire purity of heart because of the vocation they have embraced, they should set themselves free to love God and their brothers and sisters.

 

 

 

13.  As the Father sees in every person the features of his Son, the firstborn of many brothers and sisters, so the Secular Franciscans with a gentle and courteous spirit accept all people as a gift of the Lord and an image of Christ.

A sense of community will make them joyful and ready to place themselves on an equal basis with all people, especially with the lowly for whom they shall strive to create conditions of life worthy of people redeemed by Christ.

 

 

 

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4 responses »

  1. Another great blog..”One of my favorite things to do when possible (and always on vacation or retreat) is to wake early, sit outside, and pray my morning office and rosary while observing nature around me.” I don’t think you’d be sitting outiside today to do your office and rosary…brrrrrrr

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